Plating Generator 1.26.0: Creating Plates Separately and Future Updates

One of the main features I’m asked for in the Plating Generator is how to make the workflow less destructive. Without fundamentally changing some of Blender’s actual code, that’s tricky right now.  

However I’ve added a new menu option which allows you to create the plate effects separately from the main mesh, which will allow you to go back and change the plating without the original object being affected.

You can see the change in the brief video above.

Future Updates

Alongside some other minor changes and adding new patterns, I’ve been giving a lot of thought to adding Greeble Libraries to the add-on.  This should make the add-on a more extensible and new libraries could be separately created.  I’m also thinking of adding this to the Mesh Materializer.

If you’re interested in finding out more or would even like to develop some greeble libraries yourself, do get in touch via my Creator page on Blender Market: https://blendermarket.com/creators/mark-kingsnorth.  

Adding Materials to Plating Patterns

A short demo of materials being applied to a simple helmet object.

The Plating Generator now comes with the ability to add materials to the plating patterns it generates on the mesh, an often requested feature. Jaroslaw Waskowiak tipped me over the edge with this specific request (among many great suggestions):

Material variations, randomizing UVs, assigning different maps to different “plates” at random

So I set to work:

Different variations can be applied without the need for displacement maps
A close-up of the underlying topology generated and different materials being applied.
A screenshot of the settings that control the colors on the plates.
A vertex color layer can be applied so the same material can be used with different colors.
A simple example of a material’s color being driven by a vertex color layer via the Vertex Color Node.

You can assign different materials which will be applied to the grooves and randomly assigned to the plates. You can also vary the vertex colors of the plates so you can get different colored effects from the same material.

The add-on works by using the existing topology to cut out grooves for the plates in an interlocking pattern. Once those grooves are cut, the faces of the plates can be grouped and different materials automaticaly assigned.

Animation Nodes version

A version of the add-on in animation nodes with materials being applied. The file is part of the supplied samples.

I’ve also included an Animation Nodes version if the add-on so you can play with dynamically changing the effect. The file is part of the samples.

Here are another couple of examples of the add-on at work:

The plating effect (triangular mode) being applied to a basic torus shape with vertex colors applied.
The standard Blender Suzanne object with the same helmet effect applied.

Read more about the feature from the documentation.

Houdini Version

Houdini Version of the Plating Generator

I am also working on a Houdini version of the Plating Generator, but it’s not quite ready yet…here’s a sneak preview of the settings:

If you’d like to test the Houdini version, let me know in the comments.

Using L Systems to model cities

I’d been meaning to research L Systems in Houdini for some time, and wow had I been missing something. I first came across them in some of Akira Saito‘s posts where he had made some interesting mech-like beings using their organic structure:

A recent tweet from Akira Saito

I’d squinted at them before in Houdini’s L System documentation but didn’t really make sense of it. I then came across a great in-depth tutorial (if you’re as geeky as me it’s well worth the time) by the eloquent houdinikitchen who overviews the theory well with lots of examples to give a good understanding:

HoudiniKitchen’s tutorial on L-Systems

The basic idea is that you provide a set of simpl(ish) instructions called Turtle commands that describe a starting state, such as:

F+FF

…which means “Branch up one (F), rotate 90 degrees (+), and then branch up twice (FF)

Then you give it more ‘simple’ rules using the same language that alter this basic structure every generation, such as:

F=FF++F++F+F++F-F

…which says “next generation, replace all the Fs in the previous statement with the instructions here”.

This can give rise to some complex plant-like structures like the ones shipped with Houdini:

Basic L-System Tree

But interestingly you can create things like hexagonal structures as well. After a little experimentation I quickly got what looks like a snowflake:

I then tweaked the “Generations” parameter so that Houdini was part-way through a generation, which gives a more distorted structure like this:

The same hexaganol structure but at generation 4.8

I then used my own random 3D Shape Generator node and a Copy to Points node to randomly create building like structures for each point in the ‘tree’ and got this effect:

Zoomed out…
…zoomed in a bit more….
…and closer

You can download the sample file here – it will require the Shape Generator asset to work, which maybe you’ll humbly consider supporting me by taking a look at it on Gumroad here:

Nebula Generator goes Panoramic

I’ve just updated the Nebula Generator‘s 2D and 3D versions in Blender to have an additional panoramic set up, available as separate files in the downloads.

This allows you to render a panoramic view of a nebula which can then be used to produce hdris for evironments such as game backgrounds.

The 2D version was fairly straightforward to set up by switching the camera type to Panoramic and the Panorama Type to Equirectangular. This is because the set up is linked to Blender’s Cycles environment:

The 2D Nebula setup in Cycles

The 3D version was a little more challenging as the EEVEE setup does not support the Equirectangular camera mode yet. I did however come across a really useful video tutorial by United Filmdom Ltd. that describes how to set up multiple cameras to render out the views and then re-assemble them in a cube map, using a Cycles camera to to the work. It’s a little trickier and doesn’t end up with perfect seams mainly due to EEVEE’s bloom filtering (which can be edited using something like the smudge tool in Photoshop).

From this I got some good examples of the 3D nebula as a background:

A sample HDRI is here and here.

I’ve incorporated this set up as an additional set of files on the Nebula Generator available on Blender Market. If there are any questions about it do get in touch.

Re-lifeing the Blog

The storefront on Blender Market

It’s been a long road getting from there to here, as they say – I decided to temporarily close this blog a few months ago due to the high level of neglect I’d been giving it, as I have been super busy creating add-ons on the Blender Market site.

Whilst I continue to do that, I think the time’s right to bring it back as I delve even deeper into the realms of Blender, Houdini, 3DS Max and renderers like Octane.

I thought I’d use this blog to share a more permanent record of my work and experiments in the world of CG (whilst still keeping up my Twitter and Youtube presence) along with my continuing development of add-ons and plugins.

I’d also like to get some feedback from you, dear reader – so if there’s anything you’d like me to write about, such as tips n tricks in the world of 3D, let me know.

Greebles comes to the Plating Generator

I have just released a big update to the Plating Generator for Blender which includes a new collapsible interface and, most importantly, Greebles!  Thank you to all my testers who really helped me get this ready for release:

Screen Shot 2018-04-28 at 08.03.40 Screen Shot 2018-04-24 at 13.56.49 Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 23.11.10 Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 23.00.38

Screen Shot 2018-04-26 at 21.27.32 copyThis will allow Blender users to quickly add random detail to models.  A demonstration video is here where I show you how to simply create a Death Star like trench:

Features:

  • Vary the amount, size and height of the Greeble objects.
  • Choose from a range of built-in Greeble objects (Cubes, Cylinders, L-Shapes, T- Shapes)
  • Customise your Greebles by adding your own objects to the effect.
  • Choose from a selection of Blender operators: Just Plating, Just Greebles, or a specialised Plating+Greebles operator.

For this and other add-ons visit the online store.

New Add-On: Convert Bezier Curves to Meshes

My latest Blender Add-On allows you to quickly create and configure mesh surfaces from bezier curves. I think it will be ideal for creating accurate machine parts or for more organic modelling.

Here is a demo video on how it works:

Features

  • Choose to create meshes from 1, 2 or 4 curves with a customisable number of cuts in each direction that are evenly distributed by default.  Meshes can be created from curves with multiple bezier points.
  • Works on curves with multiple bezier points.
  • Useful when you need to create accurate pieces of a mesh, like an aircraft, or for more organic shapes.
  • Faces can be set to smooth or have their normals flipped during the creation process.
  • Works on a variety of bezier handle types (VectorAlignedFree)
  • A network of curves could be built up to create more complex objects.
  • Can be used as a complement to more traditional modelling techniques.
  • By default the edges will be distributed evenly, but this effect can be reduced (see instructions).
  • Compatible with my other add-ons such as the Plating GeneratorBevelled Extrude and Window Generator.

If you have any questions do get in touch – it is best to contact me via Blender Market or via Twitter as I can sometimes miss the comments here.

New Add-On: The Shape Generator

Available at https://www.blendermarket.com/products/shape-generator – a new year, a new add-on!

Quickly create and configure countless random shapes for a wide variety of purposes:

  • Generate ideas and abstract concepts for inspiration.
  • Create base meshes for further editing such as spaceships, game assets, and objects I haven’t even thought of.
  • Create shapes for background assets or to add peripheral details.

The shapes are created by specifying a random number and then changing a range of length, scale and rotation parameters of the resulting extrusions. By default, the add-on will work to ensure that the faces of the shape won’t overlap.

A demo video is here:

A more detailed list of features is available at https://www.blendermarket.com/products/shape-generator.

If you have a new feature request or any questions, either contact me via this website, the Blender Market or you can reach me on Twitter.

Nebula Generator now on Blender Market

Features:

  • Fast render times at high resolutions.
  • A range of configuration options allow you to change the colour and shape of the nebula.
  • Optional star effects that can be swapped out for your own.
  • By animating the parameters, the clouds can be made to appear as if they are moving.
  • Great for game backgrounds, animations, or concept art backdrops.
  • By default the effect is projected onto the background of the blender scene but can also be used as a texture on other objects.

Earlier versions of the node setup (version 1.2.0) will remain free on my website, however by getting this version here you will:

  • Have a priority on new feature requests.
  • Be able to take advantage of new updates.
  • Allow me to invest the time in developing the effects further.

Future roadmap:

  • Potential migration to python code if efficiencies in usability and performance can be seen.
  • Increasing ease of use of the different parameters on offer.
  • Experimentation with more 3D like effects.